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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • Submission implies that the manuscript has not been published previously, and is not currently submitted for publication elsewhere. Submission also implies that the corresponding author has consent of all authors.
  • All authors take responsibility for sending their work.
  • Contributors are responsible for obtaining permission to reproduce any material in which they do not own copyright, to be used in both print and electronic media, and for ensuring that the appropriate acknowledgements are included in their manuscript.
  • All details of personal identification must be absent from the manuscript, as well as from the file properties.
  • Submission complies with the stylistic and bibliographic requirements specified in the Authors Guidelines
  • Authors assume full responsibility for all bibliographical references.
  • When necessary, authors should accept all liability for ethical issues arising from their work. It is understood that any opinions expressed in published articles do not necessarily coincide with those of the journal's Editors, who will not accept liability for the contents included in the articles.

Author Guidelines

RiCL invites original, previously unpublished research articles, reports on corpus development, and book reviews in the field of Corpus Linguistics.

Before submitting an article, please make sure that your text observes the following guidelines. Articles that do not comply with the these guidelines will be returned for resubmission before being sent out to referees. Authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with the Sumission Preparation Checklist.

 

GENERAL GUIDELINES:

Submission implies that the manuscript has not been published previously, and is not currently submitted for publication elsewhere. Submission also implies that the corresponding author has consent of all authors.

Contributors are responsible for obtaining permission to reproduce any material in which they do not own copyright, to be used in both print and electronic media, and for ensuring that the appropriate acknowledgements are included in their manuscript.

All details of personal identification must be absent from the manuscript, as well as from the file properties.

 

PUBLICATION ETHICS:

  • All authors take responsibility for sending their work.
  • Authors assume full responsibility for all bibliographical references.
  • When necessary, authors should accept all liability for ethical issues arising from their work.
  • It is understood that any opinions expressed in published articles do not necessarily coincide with those of the journal's Editors, who will not accept liability for the contents included in the articles.

 

REGISTRATION AND LOGIN:

Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions.

In order that submissions remain anonymous for reviewing purposes, the name(s) of the author(s) and full contact details should not be provided in the document, and the author(s) should not be identifiable from the references in the remainder of the text and the acknowledgements including any pre-submission comments received or other clues to their identity.

Before submitting an article, please make sure that your text observes the following guidelines. Articles that do not comply with the style sheet will be returned for resubmission before being sent out to referees.

 

STYLISTIC, STRUCTURAL AND FORMATTING GUIDELINES

Length

  1. Papers reporting on research based on or derived from corpora should between 6,000 and 10,000 words, including title, abstract, references, notes, appendices, tables and figures.
  2. Research papers reporting on corpus construction, annotation, the development and application of corpus tools, software, etc. should have between 3,000 and 5,000 words, including title, abstract, references, notes, appendices, tables and figures.
  3. Book reviews do not require an abstract and should have between 1,500 and 3,000 words.

Spelling and language. Manuscripts should be written in proper academic English. Every effort should be made by non-native speakers of English to have their final draft checked by a colleague who is a native speaker of English. Either British English or US English conventions for spelling and expression should be followed consistently.

Spacing, fonts and indentation. 1.5pt line space and 6pt above and 6pt below for paragraphs. Except for the first paragraph of a new section or subsection, the first line of every new paragraph is indented (1 cm). Please use Times New Roman size 12pt font throughout the manuscript. Abstract, keywords and captions should be in Times New Roman 10pt.

Abstract and keywords. The first page of each article must include a 100-200 word summary or abstract. Just after the abstract append a list of up to six keywords, separated by semi-colons, so that your contribution can be accurately classified by international reference indexes.

Section headings. Section and subsection headings should be typed on separate lines, numbered and punctuated as in the following examples:

1. Introduction [small caps, centred]

1.1. Methodological considerations [italics, justified]

1.1.1. A summary of the theoretical framework [normal font type, justified]

Examples. Examples are single-spaced and numbered as follows:

                 (1)            xxxxx

                 (1a)          xxxxx

Notes. Notes should be in the form of footnotes (rather than endnotes). Notes should be avoided and limited to authorial commentary that cannot be easily accommodated in the body of the text.

Tables and figures. Tables and figures, if any, have to be numbered consecutively and referred to by their numbers within the text (e.g., as we see in example/Table 1/Figure 1). Tables and figures are centred. The title of the table/figure must appear below, centred in Times New Roman 10pt.

Quotations

Quotations of under 25 words should be included in double quotation marks in the running text. All punctuation marks should precede closing quotation marks as follows:

            Smith (2018: 20) considers that collocation and valency are “near neighbours in the lexis-grammar continuum.” 

Longer quotations should be set off, indented (0.5 cm) and never enclosed in quotation marks. An 11pt font should be used.

Single quotation marks are restricted to names of concepts, as in the following example:

          the term ‘Pragmatic Marker’, which is one of the most general and widely accepted terms,...

Other typographical conventions.

Square brackets ([ ]) are used for an unavoidable parenthesis within a parenthesis, to enclose interpolations or comments in a quotation or incomplete data and to enclose phonetic transcription.

Italics. The use of italics is restricted to foreign words or abbreviations, such as et al., sqq., etc.

References. In-text references must be inserted as follows (please note the use of long em-dash to mark page ranges and the use of "and" rather than ampersand "&" for multiple authors):

                 see Smith and Wilson (1993: 481–483)

                 ... and elsewhere (see Smith 1993: 481–483)

If several references are cited within brackets, they must be arranged chronologically and separated by semi-colons, as follows:

                 (Goldberg 1980; Erman 1987, 2001; Fox Tree and Schrock 2002; Brinton 2007; Beeching 2016)

 

As for the ‘References’ section, the style is as follows:

Books

Blevins, Juliette. 2004. Evolutionary Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Fromkin, Victoria A. 1973. Speech Errors as Linguistic Evidence. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Östman, Jan-Ola. 1981. You Know: A Discourse-Functional Approach. Amsterdam: John Benjamins

Schiffrin, Deborah. 1987. Discourse Markers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Journals

Casali, Roderic F. 1998. Predicting ATR activity. Chicago Linguistic Society (CLS) 34/1: 55–68.

Johnson, Kyle, Mark Baker and Ian Roberts. 1989. Passive arguments raised. Linguistic Inquiry 20: 219–251.

On-line resources

Franks, Steven. 2005. Bulgarian clitics are positioned in the syntax. http://www.cogs.indiana.edu/people/homepages/franks/Bg_clitics_remark_dense.pdf (17 May, 2006.)

Collective volumes

Jucker, Andreas H. and Yael Ziv eds. 1998. Discourse Markers: Descriptions and Theory. Amsterdam: John Benjamins

Webelhuth, Gert ed. 1995. Government and Binding Theory and the Minimalist Program: Principles and Parameters in Syntactic Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

Chapters in collective volumes

Jucker, Andreas H. and Sara Smith. 1998. And people just you know like ‘wow’: Discourse markers as negotiating strategies. In Andreas H. Jucker and Yael Ziv eds. Discourse Markers: Descriptions and Theory. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 171–201.

McCarthy, John J. and Alan S. Prince. 1999. Prosodic morphology. In John A. Goldsmith ed. Phonological Theory: The Essential Readings. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 238–288.

Dictionaries and primary resources

Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edn. 1989. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Dissertations

Stewart, Thomas W. Jr. 2000. Mutation as Morphology: Bases, Stems, and Shapes in Scottish Gaelic. Columbus, OH: The Ohio State University dissertation.

Privacy Statement

Submission of your paper to this journal implies that the paper is not under submission for publication elsewhere. Material which has been previously copyrighted, published or accepted for publication will not be considered for publication in this journal. The submission of a manuscript is interpreted as a statement of certification that no part of the manuscript is copyrighted by any other publisher nor is under review by any other formal publication. By submitting your manuscript to RiCL, you agree on its copyright guidelines. It is your responsibility to ensure that your manuscript does not cause any copyright infringements, defamation, and other problems.

Submitted papers are assumed to contain no proprietary material unprotected by patent or patent application; responsibility for technical content and for protection of proprietary material rests solely with the author(s) and their organizations and is not the responsibility of the journal or its editorial staff. The main author is responsible for ensuring that the article has been seen and approved by all the other authors. It is the responsibility of the author to obtain all necessary copyright release permissions for the use of any copyrighted materials in the manuscript prior to the submission.

Authors may be asked to sign a warranty and copyright agreement upon acceptance of their manuscript, before the manuscript can be published.